CBIS News and Events

News & Events

Commencement 2018 Profile: Catherine Mann

From an early age, Cate Mann envisioned a future connected to the biological sciences. But it was only at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute that she found her future in bioinformatics, a blend of computer science and biology.

Dr. Gina O'Connor to speak at Frontiers of Biotechnology Seminar Series

Conventional wisdom suggests that breakthroughs come from lean, nimble startups, while large mature companies compete through operational excellence and incremental innovation, yet this is not necessarily the case. This research program has followed companies’ attempts to build a capability for breakthrough innovation over three phases. Dr. O’Connor presents insights to the challenges companies face and ways they are circumventing them to build management systems to bring breakthroughs to market.

Rensselaer Graduate Student Awarded Lush Prize for Work To End Animal Research in Toxicology

Carolina Motter Catarino, a graduate student in chemical and biological engineering at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, has been awarded £10,000 from the Lush Prize, which is a collaboration between cosmetics company Lush and research organization Ethical Consumer. As the largest prize fund for the complete replacement of animal experiments, it funds projects working to end animal research in toxicology (chemical testing).

NIH Predoctoral Fellow Katie Hollowood Awarded at 44th NEBEC

Congratulations to NIH Predoctoral Fellow Katie Hollowood for winning the "Most Impactful on Human Health" award at the 44th Northeast Bioengineering Engineering Conference held March 28th-30th at Drexel University! Katie was awarded for her presentation "Analysis of Metabolites from Blood Samples of Pregnant Mothers and Probability of Autism Diagnosis of the Child". Katie is a 2nd year graduate student in Professor Juergen Hahn's lab. Her research focuses on metabolic pathways and biomarkers related to Autism Spectrum Disorder. Katie has been a NIH-supported trainee in the NIH Training Program in Biomolecular Science and Engineering since August 2017.

Building Lithium-Sulfur Batteries With Paper Biomass

A major byproduct in the papermaking industry is lignosulfonate, a sulfonated carbon waste material, which is typically combusted on site, releasing CO2 into the atmosphere after sulfur has been captured for reuse.

Now researchers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute have developed a method to use this cheap and abundant paper biomass to build a rechargeable lithium-sulfur battery. Such a battery could be used to power big data centers as well as provide a cheaper energy-storage option for microgrids and the traditional electric grid.

Freshman Applications for Class of 2022 Surge Past 20,000

 A record total of 20,377 high school students have filed applications to attend Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute this fall, according to numbers released by the Rensselaer Office of Admissions. This year’s total represents an increase of 5 percent over last year’s numbers.

Graduate Engineering Programs Rank Among Best in the Nation

The graduate programs in engineering at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute are once again considered among the best in the United States, according to the U.S. News & World Report Best Graduate Schools rankings released this week. This year, Rensselaer’s graduate engineering programs have been ranked 41st in the nation.

Rensselaer To Hold Fifth Annual R Pi Day March 14

On Wednesday, March 14, Rensselaer will hold the fifth annual RPi Day (Rπ), a one-day giving campaign to raise funds for Rensselaer students.

Rensselaer Among Best Colleges in New York State

The accolades keep coming for Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, a world-class technological university located in Troy, New York. Recently, College Choice, a leading authority on college rankings and resources, ranked Rensselaer number 8 among the best colleges in New York state.

Rensselaer Launches Transportation Service for After Hours

The Office of Student Life at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute has launched a new program designed to provide safe transportation for students during evening hours, which will supplement the Institute’s existing shuttle service.

Tracking Traffic in the Divided World of a Nerve Cell

The split personality of a nerve cell illustrates a puzzle. Nerve cells are divided in two domains – the axon sends signals and the dendrites receive them

Rensselaer Student Awarded Congress-Bundestag Youth Exchange Fellowship

Kent Rapp ’19, a chemical and biological engineering major, has received a fellowship from the Congress-Bundestag Youth Exchange for Young Professionals (CBYX) program. He has been studying genetic engineering, bioinformatics, and systems biology at the University of Rostock in Germany since October and began the final phase of the fellowship in January with Willpower Energy, a German startup that helps homeowners produce their own fuel from atmospheric carbon dioxide, water, and electricity.

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In the News

  • Improving a plastic-degrading enzyme for better PET recycling

    March 5, 2018 -

    Stabilizing a bacterial enzyme by strategically decorating it with sugars could help it to recycle one of the most widely used plastics and ultimately keep that plastic out of the landfill (Biochemistry 2018, DOI: 10.1021/acs.biochem.7b01189).

  • NPR's The Academic Minute

    January 19, 2018 -

    From circadian rhythms to corporate financing reporting, Rensselaer research was featured all week on NPR's Academic Minute on WAMC.

  • Can road salt and other pollutants disrupt our circadian rhythms?

    January 12, 2018 -

    Every winter, local governments across the United States apply millions of tons of road salt to keep streets navigable during snow and ice storms. Runoff from melting snow carries road salt into streams and lakes, and causes many bodies of water to have extraordinarily high salinity.

    At Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, my colleague Rick Relyea and his lab are working to quantify how increases in salinity affect ecosystems. Not surprisingly, they have found that high salinity has negative impacts on many species. They have also discovered that some species have the ability to cope with these increases in salinity.

  • The Remarkable Career of Shirley Ann Jackson

    December 21, 2017 - Shirley Ann Jackson worked to help bring about more diversity at MIT, where she was the first African-American woman to earn a doctorate. She then applied her mix of vision and pragmatism in the lab, in Washington, and at the helm of a major research university.
  • Despite a Small Staff, Tissue Engineering Lab Has a Broad Research Focus

    December 11, 2017 -

    Despite its size, Dr. Mariah Hahn’s lab at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute is an important part of the broader tissue-engineering research community. The lab has two main goals: creating disease models to more effectively screen potential therapeutics before they are tested in small animals and designing better materials to help organs and tissues repair themselves following injury or scarring.

  • The Jefferson Papers - Changing forests, insecticides, and wetland ecosystems

    November 9, 2017 -

    The Jefferson Project at Lake George is conducting research into how human activities may affect the lake, which include attached wetlands and the surrounding watershed. Here, we summarize research on the combined effects of changing forests and a commonly applied insecticide on wetland ecosystems, which was published recently in the journal Environmental Pollution.

  • The Jefferson Papers - Forests, Road Salt and Wetlands Ecosystem Research Published

    November 9, 2017 -

    The Jefferson Project at Lake George is conducting research into how human activities may affect the lake. Here, we summarize research on the effects of road salt and changing forest composition on wetland ecosystems, which was published recently in the journal Freshwater Science .

  • Picture of the Day: Can environmental toxins disrupt the biological clock?

    November 7, 2017 -

    Can environmental toxins disrupt circadian rhythms -- the biological clock whose disturbance is linked to chronic inflammation and a host of human disorders? Research showing a link between circadian disruption and plankton that have adapted to road salt pollution puts the question squarely on the table. The research builds on recent findings from the Jefferson Project at Lake George, showing that a common species of zooplankton, Daphnia pulex (shown here), can evolve tolerance to moderate levels of road salt in as little as two and a half months. That research produced five populations of Daphnia adapted to salt concentrations ranging from the current concentration of 15 milligrams-per-liter of chloride in Lake George to concentrations of 1,000 milligrams-per-liter, as found in highly contaminated lakes in North America.

  • WE’RE POURING MILLIONS OF TONS OF SALT ON ROADS EACH WINTER. HERE’S WHY THAT’S A PROBLEM.

    November 7, 2017 -

    Despite the ever-greater use, road salt’s effects on streams, lakes and groundwater have been largely ignored until recently. As recently as 2014, when biologist Rick Relyea began studying the effects of salt-laden runoff at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, “the world of science didn’t pay very much attention to the impacts of road salt on water,” he says. “Now we’re paying much more attention.”

  • The Hidden Dangers of Road Salt

    May 30, 2017 -

    “It has a really widespread number of effects on the whole food web or ecosystem,” says Rick Relyea, a professor of biological sciences at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. Relyea has studied how road salt runoff impacts lakes as part of the Jefferson Project at Lake George in New York state. Recently, he found that road salt can reduce the size of rainbow trout hatchlings by about 30 percent, influencing their ability to elude predators and decreasing the number of eggs they lay. One experiment he worked on found that higher levels of salt could change the male-female sex ration of wood frogs.

  • Experimental blood test could speed autism diagnosis-U.S. study

    March 16, 2017 -

    Developers of an experimental blood test for autism say it can detect the condition in more than 96 percent of cases and do so across a broad spectrum of patients, potentially allowing for earlier diagnosis, according to a study released on Thursday.

  • Insight into Pseudomonas aeruginosa survival mechanism

    November 11, 2016 -

    The bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa can thrive in environments as different as the moist, warm tissue in human lungs, and the dry, nutrient-deprived surface of an office wall. Such adaptability makes it problematic in healthcare.

  • RPI researchers use nanoparticles to treat influenza in mice

    November 4, 2016 -

    Researchers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute demonstrated in a paper published last month how they successfully treated immune-compromised mice exposed to the influenza virus with a new nanoparticle drug.

  • Heparin derived from cattle is equivalent to heparin from pigs, study finds

    October 6, 2016 -

    As demand for the widely used blood thinning drug heparin continues to grow, experts worry of possible shortages of the essential medication. Heparin is primarily derived from pigs, and to reduce the risk of shortages, cattle have been proposed as an additional source. A new study by a team of researchers, including corresponding author Robert J. Linhardt, and nine co-authors from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. has found that heparin derived from cattle (known as bovine heparin) has equivalent anti-clotting properties to heparin derived from pigs (porcine heparin).

  • Engineering A New Chemical Communication System Into Bacteria

    August 10, 2015 -

    Previously, synthetic biologists had only engineered synthetic quorum-sensing systems in gram-negative bacteria, such as Escherichia coli. But gram-positive bacteria are heavily used in the biotech industry to synthesize enzymes. So Cynthia H. Collins of Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and colleagues wanted to build systems that would function within these commercially important bacteria.

  • Albany-area primary care doctors try medical scribes

    May 18, 2015 -

    When Leslie Palmer went to see her longtime primary care physician, Dr. Paul Barbarotto, earlier this month, there was an extra person in the room ...

  • Rensselaer Pairs Business Students with Researchers to Aid Commercialization

    March 25, 2015 -

    Graduate-level business students at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute are working with science and engineering faculty to assist researchers in the commercialization process.

    http://bit.ly/1N7N3vz

  • Region lands $500K for biomed effort

    December 19, 2014 -

    The NY Cap Research Alliance is one of 93 projects in the Albany region receiving a share of $60 million through a state funding competition. The alliance won $500,000 last week to create a capital investment program for biomedical researchers at area colleges and health care organizations.

  • Who Made That Flavor? Maybe A Genetically Altered Microbe

    December 11, 2014 -

    Take, for instance, chemical compounds called antioxidants. Health-conscious consumers are snapping them up because there's some evidence that these substances repair damaged cells in our body, reducing the risk of cancer and heart problems.

  • New AAAS Fellows Recognized for Their Contributions to Advancing Science

    December 11, 2014 -

    Francine Berman, a professor in the computer science department at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, was elected a AAAS Fellow "for distinguished contributions to the field of computer science and community leadership in data cyber-infrastructure, digital data preservation, and high performance computing." A former chair of the AAAS section representing Information, Computing, and Communication, Berman was delighted to learn that she has been elected a AAAS Fellow.

  • Bright idea aims to minimize hospital-acquired infections

    December 11, 2014 -

    “Individuals can go into a hospital and end up even more sick than when they enter,” said Colleen Costello, a young biomedical engineer, who realized the magnitude of this problem when her grandmother contracted MRSA during a hospital stay. Her company, Vital Vio, is trying to tackle the issue by creating bacteria-killing lights.

  • Artificial Pancreas Clinical Trial Enabled by NIH Grant

    November 4, 2014 -

    An artificial pancreas, the ultimate cure for type 1 diabetes, will be tested in clinical trials as a result of a $1 million National Institutes of Health Grant awarded to Dr. B. Wayne Bequette of Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute to fund research concerning his closed-loop artificial pancreas developed along with colleagues at Stanford University, the University of Colorado, and the University of Virginia. Frequent insulin injections and blood samples may be a thing of the past for recipients of the device.

  • RPI celebrates 100 years of chemical engineering

    October 12, 2014 -

    One century ago now, the students and faculty helped shape the young field of chemical engineering, using their talents to advance technologies and find new ways to use a range of chemicals ... “The story of chemical engineering at Rensselaer is the story of a major success,” RPI Dean of Engineering Shekhar Garde said. “When you think about chemical engineering, you think about traditional refining and chemical plants and so on, but over the past 100 years, it has evolved into modern discipline.”

  • Chemical engineering hits century mark at RPI

    October 12, 2014 -

    Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute celebrated 100 years of teaching chemical engineering on Thursday with demonstrations by students and faculty on research and discoveries ... Shekhar Garde, dean of the school of engineering at RPI, said the public may perceive chemical engineering to involve mostly oil refineries and chemical plants, but in reality, it involves cutting-edge engineering at the molecular level, involving everything from computer chips to drug development. Chemical engineers are even looking at developing circuitry in cells that could target disease.

  • RPI biotechnology center celebrates first decade

    September 12, 2014 -

    TROY >> Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute’s $100 million Center for Biotechnology and Interdisciplinary Studies, now 10 years old, began as a vision shared by RPI President Dr. Shirley Ann Jackson in her 1999 inaugural address.

  • Decade of growth in RPI biotech unit

    September 10, 2014 -

    It was 15 years ago that newly inauguratedRensselaer Polytechnic Institute PresidentShirley Ann Jackson called for the creation of a biotechnology institute that would draw on multiple disciplines to produce breakthroughs in health and medicine.

    Rensselaer's Center for Biotechnology andInterdisciplinary Studies, which opened its doors five years later, will celebrate its 10th anniversary Wednesday.

  • Scientists use 3D printed tissue to study cells

    July 24, 2014 -

    Scientist Guohao Dai, an assistant professor in the Department of Biomedical Engineering at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in the U.S, has won the Faculty Early Career Development Award from the National Science Foundation for his research into making replicated human tissues using 3D printing.