CBIS News and Events

News & Events

Improving Nature’s Tools for Digesting Plastic

Building on what nature has provided, researchers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute have improved the efficiency of a leaf and branch compost cutinase that  breaks down polyethylene terephthalate (PET), the plastic used in clear and colored plastic water bottles and many other products.

How a Cell Knows When To Divide

How does a cell know when to divide? We know that hundreds of genes contribute to a wave of activity linked to cell division, but to generate that wave new research shows that cells must first grow large enough to produce four key proteins in adequate amounts.

Commencement 2018 Profile: Catherine Mann

From an early age, Cate Mann envisioned a future connected to the biological sciences. But it was only at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute that she found her future in bioinformatics, a blend of computer science and biology.

Dr. Gina O'Connor to speak at Frontiers of Biotechnology Seminar Series
Wednesday, May 2, 2018, 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM, CBIS- Bruggeman Room
“From the Lab to the Market: Large Mature Companies and the Challenges of Commercializing Breakthroughs”
Conventional wisdom suggests that breakthroughs come from lean, nimble startups, while large mature companies compete through operational excellence and incremental innovation, yet this is not necessarily the case. This research program has followed companies’ attempts to build a capability for breakthrough innovation over three phases. Dr. O’Connor presents insights to the challenges companies face and ways they are circumventing them to build management systems to bring breakthroughs to market.
Rensselaer Graduate Student Awarded Lush Prize for Work To End Animal Research in Toxicology

Carolina Motter Catarino, a graduate student in chemical and biological engineering at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, has been awarded £10,000 from the Lush Prize, which is a collaboration between cosmetics company Lush and research organization Ethical Consumer. As the largest prize fund for the complete replacement of animal experiments, it funds projects working to end animal research in toxicology (chemical testing).

NIH Predoctoral Fellow Katie Hollowood Awarded at 44th NEBEC

Congratulations to NIH Predoctoral Fellow Katie Hollowood for winning the "Most Impactful on Human Health" award at the 44th Northeast Bioengineering Engineering Conference held March 28th-30th at Drexel University! Katie was awarded for her presentation "Analysis of Metabolites from Blood Samples of Pregnant Mothers and Probability of Autism Diagnosis of the Child". Katie is a 2nd year graduate student in Professor Juergen Hahn's lab. Her research focuses on metabolic pathways and biomarkers related to Autism Spectrum Disorder. Katie has been a NIH-supported trainee in the NIH Training Program in Biomolecular Science and Engineering since August 2017.

Building Lithium-Sulfur Batteries With Paper Biomass

A major byproduct in the papermaking industry is lignosulfonate, a sulfonated carbon waste material, which is typically combusted on site, releasing CO2 into the atmosphere after sulfur has been captured for reuse.

Now researchers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute have developed a method to use this cheap and abundant paper biomass to build a rechargeable lithium-sulfur battery. Such a battery could be used to power big data centers as well as provide a cheaper energy-storage option for microgrids and the traditional electric grid.

Freshman Applications for Class of 2022 Surge Past 20,000

 A record total of 20,377 high school students have filed applications to attend Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute this fall, according to numbers released by the Rensselaer Office of Admissions. This year’s total represents an increase of 5 percent over last year’s numbers.

Graduate Engineering Programs Rank Among Best in the Nation

The graduate programs in engineering at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute are once again considered among the best in the United States, according to the U.S. News & World Report Best Graduate Schools rankings released this week. This year, Rensselaer’s graduate engineering programs have been ranked 41st in the nation.

Rensselaer To Hold Fifth Annual R Pi Day March 14

On Wednesday, March 14, Rensselaer will hold the fifth annual RPi Day (Rπ), a one-day giving campaign to raise funds for Rensselaer students.

Rensselaer Among Best Colleges in New York State

The accolades keep coming for Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, a world-class technological university located in Troy, New York. Recently, College Choice, a leading authority on college rankings and resources, ranked Rensselaer number 8 among the best colleges in New York state.

Rensselaer Launches Transportation Service for After Hours

The Office of Student Life at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute has launched a new program designed to provide safe transportation for students during evening hours, which will supplement the Institute’s existing shuttle service.

Pages

In the News

  • For healthier lakes, rivers, and drinking water, hold the salt

    February 6, 2019 -

    Rick Relyea, an environmental scientist at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, is tackling similarly thorny questions in upstate New York’s Lake George, which has been called the Queen of American Lakes. Relyea leads the Jefferson Project, a collaboration among RPI, IBM, and the FUND for Lake George, a nonprofit focused on conserving the lake. The project has outfitted the lake with more than 500 “smart” environmental sensors during the past four years to monitor human influence on it. Over the past four decades, according to data from the Lake George Offshore Chemical Monitoring Program, chloride levels have tripled in Lake George, adding to other environmental effects on the lake. These effects include the rise of invasive species and the delivery, through stormwater runoff, of pollutants and nutrients that can stimulate algal blooms. Because it’s hard to tease apart the impacts of these various stressors on the lake’s water quality and wildlife, Relyea’s team has done a bevy of experiments in the lab and in large outdoor tanks to isolate and examine the consequences of increasing salt.

  • Freshwater Is Getting Saltier, Threatening People and Wildlife

    December 21, 2018 -

    Salts that de-ice roads, parking lots and sidewalks keep people safe in winter. But new research shows they are contributing to a sharp and widely rising problem across the U.S. At least a third of the rivers and streams in the country have gotten saltier in the past 25 years. And by 2100, more than half of them may contain at least 50 percent more salt than they used to. Increasing salinity will not just affect freshwater plants and animals but human lives as well—notably, by affecting drinking water.

  • Brain Scans Can Detect Who Has Better Skills

    October 3, 2018 -

    To gain new insight into how highly specialized workers learn skills or react to stressful situations, researchers are leveraging advanced scanning technologies to look at what’s happening inside the brain.