CBIS News and Events

News & Events

Rensselaer To Hold Fifth Annual R Pi Day March 14

On Wednesday, March 14, Rensselaer will hold the fifth annual RPi Day (Rπ), a one-day giving campaign to raise funds for Rensselaer students.

Rensselaer Among Best Colleges in New York State

The accolades keep coming for Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, a world-class technological university located in Troy, New York. Recently, College Choice, a leading authority on college rankings and resources, ranked Rensselaer number 8 among the best colleges in New York state.

Rensselaer Launches Transportation Service for After Hours

The Office of Student Life at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute has launched a new program designed to provide safe transportation for students during evening hours, which will supplement the Institute’s existing shuttle service.

Tracking Traffic in the Divided World of a Nerve Cell

The split personality of a nerve cell illustrates a puzzle. Nerve cells are divided in two domains – the axon sends signals and the dendrites receive them

Rensselaer Student Awarded Congress-Bundestag Youth Exchange Fellowship

Kent Rapp ’19, a chemical and biological engineering major, has received a fellowship from the Congress-Bundestag Youth Exchange for Young Professionals (CBYX) program. He has been studying genetic engineering, bioinformatics, and systems biology at the University of Rostock in Germany since October and began the final phase of the fellowship in January with Willpower Energy, a German startup that helps homeowners produce their own fuel from atmospheric carbon dioxide, water, and electricity.

Lee Ligon Named Associate Dean of the School of Science

Lee Ligon, associate professor of biological sciences at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, has been appointed associate dean for academic affairs in the School of Science at Rensselaer.

Rensselaer Shows Its Heart at EMPAC

During the month of February, the Curtis R. Priem Experimental Media and Performing Arts Center (EMPAC) at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute will be illuminated with pulsing red lights as part of the American Heart Association’s effort to remind people that heart disease is the number one killer of women in America.

Rensselaer Selected for Princeton Review’s 2018 Edition of “Colleges That Pay You Back”

Rensselaer is among the nation’s best colleges and universities for students seeking an outstanding education with great career preparation, according to The Princeton Review.

Professor John Tichy Receives Donald Wilcock Distinguished Service Award

Tribology expert John Tichy, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute professor of mechanical, aerospace, and nuclear engineering, has received the Donald Wilcock Distinguished Service Award from the Tribology Division of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME).

World Economic Forum Annual Meeting Ponders a Challenging Future

 

Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute President Shirley Ann Jackson recently returned from the World Economic Forum’s Annual Meeting of the Global Future Councils, which took place Nov. 11-12 in Dubai. The annual meeting brought together more than 700 members of the Network of Global Future Councils to shape a better future.

Exploring the Common Gut Bacteria Bacteroides

With support from a four-year $3 million grant from the National Institutes of Health, Blanca Barquera, an associate professor of biological sciences, and a team including researchers at Tufts University and Harvard Brigham and Women’s Hospital are examining evidence that Bacteroides can create energy with and without oxygen by using aerobic and anaerobic respiration, an unusual feature among many human gut bacteria. 

Can Environmental Toxins Disrupt the Biological “Clock”?

Can environmental toxins disrupt circadian rhythms – the biological “clock” whose disturbance is linked to chronic inflammation and a host of human disorders? New research findings puts question squarely on the table.

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In the News

  • For healthier lakes, rivers, and drinking water, hold the salt

    February 6, 2019 -

    Rick Relyea, an environmental scientist at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, is tackling similarly thorny questions in upstate New York’s Lake George, which has been called the Queen of American Lakes. Relyea leads the Jefferson Project, a collaboration among RPI, IBM, and the FUND for Lake George, a nonprofit focused on conserving the lake. The project has outfitted the lake with more than 500 “smart” environmental sensors during the past four years to monitor human influence on it. Over the past four decades, according to data from the Lake George Offshore Chemical Monitoring Program, chloride levels have tripled in Lake George, adding to other environmental effects on the lake. These effects include the rise of invasive species and the delivery, through stormwater runoff, of pollutants and nutrients that can stimulate algal blooms. Because it’s hard to tease apart the impacts of these various stressors on the lake’s water quality and wildlife, Relyea’s team has done a bevy of experiments in the lab and in large outdoor tanks to isolate and examine the consequences of increasing salt.

  • Freshwater Is Getting Saltier, Threatening People and Wildlife

    December 21, 2018 -

    Salts that de-ice roads, parking lots and sidewalks keep people safe in winter. But new research shows they are contributing to a sharp and widely rising problem across the U.S. At least a third of the rivers and streams in the country have gotten saltier in the past 25 years. And by 2100, more than half of them may contain at least 50 percent more salt than they used to. Increasing salinity will not just affect freshwater plants and animals but human lives as well—notably, by affecting drinking water.

  • Brain Scans Can Detect Who Has Better Skills

    October 3, 2018 -

    To gain new insight into how highly specialized workers learn skills or react to stressful situations, researchers are leveraging advanced scanning technologies to look at what’s happening inside the brain.