CBIS News and Events

News & Events

Rensselaer Experts Available To Discuss COVID-19 Pandemic and Effects on Society

In addition to the capabilities of one of the most powerful supercomputers in the world, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute recently announced that it was making the expertise of its world-renowned faculty available to the broader research community to support work responding to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Water-Conducting Membrane Allows Carbon Dioxide To Transform into Fuel More Efficiently

TROY, N.Y. — Methanol is a versatile and efficient chemical used as fuel in the production of countless products. Carbon dioxide (CO2), on the other hand, is a greenhouse gas that is the unwanted byproduct of many industrial processes.

Novel Compound is Promising Drug Candidate for Alzheimer’s Disease

A newly identified compound is a promising candidate for inhibiting the production of amyloids, the abnormal proteins that form toxic clumps, called fibrils, inside the brains of patients with Alzheimer’s disease. As published in the Royal Society of Chemistry’s Chemical Communications, the compound — known as “C1” — uses a novel mechanism to efficiently prevent the enzyme gamma-secretase from producing amyloids.

Rensselaer Announces New Degree Program in Biological Neuroscience

A new degree program in biological neuroscience at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute explores the structure and function of the brain and nervous system. The major, which was recently approved by the New York State Education Department, will be offered beginning in the spring 2020 semester through the Rensselaer Department of Biological Sciences.

Structurally Designed DNA Star Creates Ultra-Sensitive Test for Dengue Virus

By folding snippets of DNA into the shape of a five-pointed star using structural DNA nanotechnology, researchers have created a trap that captures Dengue virus as it floats in the bloodstream. 

New Technique Aims to Improve Imaging of Cells

TROY, N.Y. — Improving the detection, diagnosis, and treatment of diseases like cancer will require more detailed, rapid, and agile imaging technology that can show doctors not just what a specific organ looks like, but also what’s happening within the cells that make up those tissues.

Research Aims To Make Technologies for Controlling Blood Sugar More Accessible

Researchers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute have been working on two fronts to perfect continuous blood glucose monitor and insulin pump technologies: they are developing algorithms to create a closed-loop system that can effectively operate similar to a healthy pancreas, and they are working to make that system more accessible and understandable for users with diabetes.

Atomic-Level Analysis of Bone Aims to Predict and Lessen Fractures in Diabetics

People with diabetes face a significantly higher risk of osteoporotic fractures than those without the disease, but the reason for this is not well understood and can’t be adequately predicted.

Living Skin Can Now be 3D-Printed With Blood Vessels Included

TROY, N.Y. — Researchers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute have developed a way to 3D print living skin, complete with blood vessels. The advancement, published online today in Tissue Engineering Part A, is a significant step toward creating grafts that are more like the skin our bodies produce naturally.

Elizabeth Blaber Awarded NASA Space Biology Grant to Participate on the BionM2 Spaceflight Mission

Elizabeth Blaber, Assistant Professor in Biomedical Engineering, is among nine grant recipients to participate on the BionM2 spaceflight mission with RosCosmos.

Polymerized Estrogen Shown to Protect Nervous System Cells

TROY, N.Y. — Spinal cord damage that causes paralysis and reduced mobility doesn’t always stop with the initial trauma, but there are few treatment options to halt increased deterioration — and there is no cure. Researchers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute have developed a promising new biomaterial that could offer targeted treatment to the damaged spinal cord and tissue, preventing further damage.

Protein Movement in Cells Hints at Greater Mysteries

A new imaging technique that makes it possible to match motor proteins with the cargo they carry within a cell is upending a standard view of how cellular traffic reaches the correct destination.

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