CBIS News and Events

News & Events

Can Environmental Toxins Disrupt the Biological “Clock”?

Can environmental toxins disrupt circadian rhythms – the biological “clock” whose disturbance is linked to chronic inflammation and a host of human disorders? New research findings puts question squarely on the table.

Advancing Personalized Anti-Cancer Drugs

Researchers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and Albany Medical Center are working together to develop three-dimensional bioprinting and imaging techniques that will generate and analyze tumor models in the laboratory, with the goal of accelerating the development and optimization of personalized anti-cancer drugs.

Understanding Heart Disease

The Center for Biotechnology and Interdisciplinary Studies was buzzing with activity over the summer, with more than 200 undergraduate and graduate students conducting research that will impact the global challenges facing humanity. In the lab of Douglas Swank, associate professor of biological sciences, researchers are using Drosophila (commonly known as the fruit fly) as a model organism to unravel some of the biggest mysteries of the human heart.

Confronting Dementia From Lab to Bedside

To bolster the connections between benchside and bedside, the National Institutes of Health National Institute on Aging has awarded Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute a five-year $1.5 million training grant to support a new Alzheimer’s Disease Clinical and Translational Research Training Program. 

Research Showcase Focuses on Biotechnology and Life Sciences

The fourth annual Rensselaer Research Showcase on August 23 offered government and private sector research partners an opportunity to learn more about insights emerging from research in biotechnology and the life sciences, and the current climate for the biopharmaceutical economy that work supports.

Rensselaer To Welcome Class of 2021

This weekend, 1,682 new students will make their way to Rensselaer to start the next stage of their academic careers.

Bacteria Make Natural Pigment From Simple Sugar

Researchers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute have shown that four strains of E. coli bacteria working together can convert sugar into the natural red anthocyanin pigment found in strawberries, opening the door to economical natural colors for industrial applications.

Research Uncovers a Novel Mechanism of Common Anesthetic Propofol

Researchers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and the University of Pennsylvania found that the anesthetic propofol inhibits the activity of kinesins, a class of motor proteins that provides critical services within a cell. 

Rensselaer Professor Edmund Palermo Receives NSF CAREER Award

 

Edmund F. Palermo, assistant professor of materials science and engineering at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, has won a Faculty Early Career Development Award (CAREER) from the National Science Foundation (NSF). He will use the five-year, $539,177 award to study “Biomimetic Macromolecules at the Materials-Microbe Interface.”

A Moldable Scaffold for Bone

A team including researchers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute is developing a bioactive foam that can be used to replace skull bone lost to injury, surgery, or birth defect. 

Proteins That Can Take the Heat

Ancient proteins may offer clues on how to engineer proteins that can withstand the high temperatures required in industrial applications, according to new research published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science

Graduate Engineering Programs Ranked 39th in the Nation

The graduate programs in engineering at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute are once again considered among the best in the United States, according to the U.S. News & World Report Best Graduate Schools rankings released last week. For the third year in a row Rensselaer’s graduate engineering programs have been ranked 39th in the nation.

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In the News

  • For healthier lakes, rivers, and drinking water, hold the salt

    February 6, 2019 -

    Rick Relyea, an environmental scientist at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, is tackling similarly thorny questions in upstate New York’s Lake George, which has been called the Queen of American Lakes. Relyea leads the Jefferson Project, a collaboration among RPI, IBM, and the FUND for Lake George, a nonprofit focused on conserving the lake. The project has outfitted the lake with more than 500 “smart” environmental sensors during the past four years to monitor human influence on it. Over the past four decades, according to data from the Lake George Offshore Chemical Monitoring Program, chloride levels have tripled in Lake George, adding to other environmental effects on the lake. These effects include the rise of invasive species and the delivery, through stormwater runoff, of pollutants and nutrients that can stimulate algal blooms. Because it’s hard to tease apart the impacts of these various stressors on the lake’s water quality and wildlife, Relyea’s team has done a bevy of experiments in the lab and in large outdoor tanks to isolate and examine the consequences of increasing salt.

  • Freshwater Is Getting Saltier, Threatening People and Wildlife

    December 21, 2018 -

    Salts that de-ice roads, parking lots and sidewalks keep people safe in winter. But new research shows they are contributing to a sharp and widely rising problem across the U.S. At least a third of the rivers and streams in the country have gotten saltier in the past 25 years. And by 2100, more than half of them may contain at least 50 percent more salt than they used to. Increasing salinity will not just affect freshwater plants and animals but human lives as well—notably, by affecting drinking water.

  • Brain Scans Can Detect Who Has Better Skills

    October 3, 2018 -

    To gain new insight into how highly specialized workers learn skills or react to stressful situations, researchers are leveraging advanced scanning technologies to look at what’s happening inside the brain.