CBIS News and Events

News & Events

Rensselaer Part of Nationwide Effort To Advance Manufacturing Biopharmaceuticals

Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute will be part of a new $200 million public-private partnership to advance U.S. leadership in biopharmaceuticals.

Tracking the Circadian Clock

In organisms from fungi to humans, the relationship between the genome, proteome, and matalome is heavily influenced by our internal circadian clock, and responds to environmental influences. 

More Than $24 Million Raised for Student Scholarship Support

Rensselaer held its Inaugural Scholarship Gala—and announced that is has raised over $24 million in scholarship support in the last two years—at the Mandarin Oriental in New York City Nov. 17. The Gala raised support for the Institute’s scholarship initiative, Bridging the Gap, and presented its newest honor, the Presidential Lifetime Achievement Award, to three recipients—IBM, Howard N. Blitman P.E., Class of 1950, and Curtis R. Priem, Class of 1982.

Rensselaer Team Is Finalist in $2.5 Million Amazon Alexa Prize

A team from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute has been selected by Amazon to receive sponsorship for competing in the inaugural $2.5 million Amazon Alexa Prize competition. 

Undergraduate Women Engineers Top 1,000

While Rensselaer celebrated its largest class in history earlier this fall, it also marked another important milestone. For the first time in the Institute’s almost 200-year history, there are more than 1,000 women enrolled in the School of Engineering’s undergraduate programs.

Making Old Bones New Again – From Rensselaer to King’s College

The director of the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Center for Biotechnology & Interdisciplinary Studies (CBIS) will deliver the inaugural address today in a lecture series at King’s College London that honors a pillar of the biomaterials community.

Global NY Foreign Direct Investment Road Show Visits Rensselaer

On Nov. 3, representatives from 25 foreign countries and territories toured business and academic locations in the Capital Region—including Rensselaer Polytechnic Insitute—as part of an initiative to attract foreign direct investment (FDI) to New York state.

NSF Supports Completion of The Jefferson Project at Lake George Sensor Network

With support from the National Science Foundation, The Jefferson Project at Lake George is poised to complete the most powerful aquatic monitoring sensor network in existence. 

Rensselaer Faculty Members Named to WEF Global Future Councils

Two faculty members have been invited to join the World Economic Forum’s Network of Global Future Councils. Cynthia Collins was selected for the Global Future Council on Biotechnologies, and Heng Ji was selected for the Global Future Council on the Future of Computing.

Nano-Decoy Lures Human Influenza A Virus to its Doom

To infect its victims, influenza A heads for the lungs, where it latches onto sialic acid on the surface of cells. So researchers created the perfect decoy: A carefully constructed spherical nanoparticle coated in sialic acid lures the influenza A virus to its doom.

Measuring the Forces of Biology

Biology, at the nitty-gritty level of motor proteins, DNA, and microtubules, takes its cue from physics. But while much is known about the biological components that form such cellular stuctures, researchers like Scott Forth are only beginning to explore the physical forces between those components. 

Pseudomonas aeruginosa – The Molecular Tools of a Bacterial Survivor

The bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa can thrive in environments as different as the moist, warm tissue in our lungs, and the dry, nutrient-deprived surface of an office wall. How does Pseudomonas survive in so many environments? 

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In the News

  • For healthier lakes, rivers, and drinking water, hold the salt

    February 6, 2019 -

    Rick Relyea, an environmental scientist at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, is tackling similarly thorny questions in upstate New York’s Lake George, which has been called the Queen of American Lakes. Relyea leads the Jefferson Project, a collaboration among RPI, IBM, and the FUND for Lake George, a nonprofit focused on conserving the lake. The project has outfitted the lake with more than 500 “smart” environmental sensors during the past four years to monitor human influence on it. Over the past four decades, according to data from the Lake George Offshore Chemical Monitoring Program, chloride levels have tripled in Lake George, adding to other environmental effects on the lake. These effects include the rise of invasive species and the delivery, through stormwater runoff, of pollutants and nutrients that can stimulate algal blooms. Because it’s hard to tease apart the impacts of these various stressors on the lake’s water quality and wildlife, Relyea’s team has done a bevy of experiments in the lab and in large outdoor tanks to isolate and examine the consequences of increasing salt.

  • Freshwater Is Getting Saltier, Threatening People and Wildlife

    December 21, 2018 -

    Salts that de-ice roads, parking lots and sidewalks keep people safe in winter. But new research shows they are contributing to a sharp and widely rising problem across the U.S. At least a third of the rivers and streams in the country have gotten saltier in the past 25 years. And by 2100, more than half of them may contain at least 50 percent more salt than they used to. Increasing salinity will not just affect freshwater plants and animals but human lives as well—notably, by affecting drinking water.

  • Brain Scans Can Detect Who Has Better Skills

    October 3, 2018 -

    To gain new insight into how highly specialized workers learn skills or react to stressful situations, researchers are leveraging advanced scanning technologies to look at what’s happening inside the brain.