CBIS News and Events

News & Events

The Free Energy Landscape — Amino Acid Sequence in Protein Folding

Using pressure to perturb folded proteins, biotechnology researcher Catherine Royer will explore the path of a protein from its unfolded to folded state, advancing our ability to optimize proteins for industrial and pharmaceutical applications.

Federal Investments in Research Enabling Improvements in How We Age

Federal investments in research are paying off in scientific breakthroughs that are “unleashing the power and potential of proteins” in humans.

Federal Investments in Research Enabling Improvements in How We Age
Rensselaer Biotech Research Scientists are “Unleashing the Power and Potential of Proteins” To Address Osteoporosis, Alzheimer’s and More
Dordick Recognized by American Institute of Chemical Engineers

Jonathan Dordick, the Howard P. Isermann Professor of Chemical and Biological Engineering, will receive the 2015 Food, Pharmaceutical and Bioengineering Division Award in Chemical Engineering at the AIChE Annual Meeting, Nov. 8-13, in Salt Lake City.

At the Crossroads: Examining the Intersections of Science and Art

To celebrate the launch of Art_X@Rensselaer, a panel discussion on "(Bio)Designing the Future of Medicine" was held Nov. 3, 2015 in the Center for Biotechnology and Interdisciplinary Studies (CBIS) Auditorium, the third in a series of events highlighting the new initiative.

Circadian Clocks – The Rhythm of Life, From Microbes to Humans

The sleep/wake cycle of our circadian rhythm is a familiar concept, but less well known is that a circadian clock – a series of molecular events – can be found in nearly every living cell, from microbes to humans. 

Panel discussion on “(Bio)Designing the Future of Medicine” Nov. 3

To celebrate the launch of Art_X@Rensselaer, members of the campus and community are invited to the third in a series of events highlighting the new initiative on Nov.3. 

Rensselaer Professor Steven Cramer Wins American Chemical Society Award

Steven Cramer, the William Weightman Walker Professor of Polymer Engineering at Rensselaer has received an American Chemical Society award in Separations Science and Technology.

The Importance of Strain in Kinesin-14 Motor Proteins

New research shows that a single conserved mechanism governs the movement of two structurally distinct variants of kinesin-14 – a class of molecular motors that moves materials and facilitates chromosomal separation within cells. 

NIH Awards $1.3 Million for Spinal Cord Injury Research to Ryan Gilbert

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) has awarded $1.3 million to Ryan Gilbert, associate professor of biomedical engineering at Rensselaer, to support research that could give hope to the thousands of Americans who sustain life-changing spinal cord injuries each year.

A Non-Invasive Test for Surgical Site Infections in Orthopedic Implants

Researchers led by Rensselaer Professor Eric Ledet, will investigate whether small wireless sensors incorporated into orthopedic implants could be used to detect surgical site infections. 

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In the News

  • For healthier lakes, rivers, and drinking water, hold the salt

    February 6, 2019 -

    Rick Relyea, an environmental scientist at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, is tackling similarly thorny questions in upstate New York’s Lake George, which has been called the Queen of American Lakes. Relyea leads the Jefferson Project, a collaboration among RPI, IBM, and the FUND for Lake George, a nonprofit focused on conserving the lake. The project has outfitted the lake with more than 500 “smart” environmental sensors during the past four years to monitor human influence on it. Over the past four decades, according to data from the Lake George Offshore Chemical Monitoring Program, chloride levels have tripled in Lake George, adding to other environmental effects on the lake. These effects include the rise of invasive species and the delivery, through stormwater runoff, of pollutants and nutrients that can stimulate algal blooms. Because it’s hard to tease apart the impacts of these various stressors on the lake’s water quality and wildlife, Relyea’s team has done a bevy of experiments in the lab and in large outdoor tanks to isolate and examine the consequences of increasing salt.

  • Freshwater Is Getting Saltier, Threatening People and Wildlife

    December 21, 2018 -

    Salts that de-ice roads, parking lots and sidewalks keep people safe in winter. But new research shows they are contributing to a sharp and widely rising problem across the U.S. At least a third of the rivers and streams in the country have gotten saltier in the past 25 years. And by 2100, more than half of them may contain at least 50 percent more salt than they used to. Increasing salinity will not just affect freshwater plants and animals but human lives as well—notably, by affecting drinking water.

  • Brain Scans Can Detect Who Has Better Skills

    October 3, 2018 -

    To gain new insight into how highly specialized workers learn skills or react to stressful situations, researchers are leveraging advanced scanning technologies to look at what’s happening inside the brain.