CBIS News and Events

News & Events

Zinc Deficiency Linked to Activation of Hedgehog Signaling Pathway

Zinc deficiency – long associated with numerous diseases, e.g. autism, lung cancer, prostate cancer, and ovarian cancers – can lead to activation of the Hedgehog signaling pathway.

MSRP Presentations in CBIS

Please join us on Wednesday, May 6 at 12:00 noon in the Bruggeman Conference Room for presentations by these students highlighting their project, objective, investigative details, results, impact and next steps.

Rensselaer To Host 41st Northeast Bioengineering Conference

The Department of Biomedical Engineering at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute will host the 41st Northeast Bioengineering Conference (NEBEC) April 17-19. 

Bring Your Kid to Biotech Day

Bring your kid to Biotech

to have fun doing

experiments!!!!

When: Friday April 10th, 10:30 am- 12:00 pm

Where: Biotech 2nd floor (by the Bruggeman Conf.Room)

Who: Kids in Elementary School

RSVP by April 3rd at Lopezm4@rpi.edu  (spaces are limited!!)

Eric Ledet and Research Team Awarded Prize from the International Society for the Study of the Lumbar Spine

Awarded the ISSLS Prize from the International Society for the Study of the Lumbar Spine and the journal SPINE

Rensselaer Business School Students Learn to Commercialize New Technologies

Master’s degree students studying business at Rensselaer are taking their academic knowledge to the next level by learning to identify commercialization pathways for lab research discoveries and inventions. 

Using Transplanted T Cells to Relieve Inflammatory Diseases

Professor Juergen Hahn has received a $2 million NIH grant to investigate the use of transplanted regulatory T cells (Tregs) in reducing inflammation in diseases like inflammatory bowel disease, which currently has no known viable treatment options. 

New Knowledge and Innovation Program (KIP) Seed Grant

The new Knowledge and Innovation Program (KIP) of the Rensselaer Office of Research has awarded four grants to spur multidisciplinary research.

Dordick and Linhardt Named Fellows of National Academy of Inventors

Renowned biotechnology innovators Robert Linhardt and Jonathan Dordick have been named fellows of the National Academy of Inventors

A clearer view: Jefferson Project plows through winter to collect more data on Lake George.

The Jefferson Project made the front page of the Sunday Times Union, January 4, 2015.  Read the full article at the Times Union

OMNI-TOMOGRAPHY: ONE CONCEPT FOR EVERYTHING A pioneer in medical imaging pursues his field's holy grail

Engineers are often reluctant to use the word breakthrough. It smacks of marketing hype. Most advances in engineering are incremental. The history of technology is littered with self-proclaimed breakthroughs that turned out less than spectacular.

But believe this: Ge Wang is in pursuit of a breakthrough.

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In the News

  • For healthier lakes, rivers, and drinking water, hold the salt

    February 6, 2019 -

    Rick Relyea, an environmental scientist at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, is tackling similarly thorny questions in upstate New York’s Lake George, which has been called the Queen of American Lakes. Relyea leads the Jefferson Project, a collaboration among RPI, IBM, and the FUND for Lake George, a nonprofit focused on conserving the lake. The project has outfitted the lake with more than 500 “smart” environmental sensors during the past four years to monitor human influence on it. Over the past four decades, according to data from the Lake George Offshore Chemical Monitoring Program, chloride levels have tripled in Lake George, adding to other environmental effects on the lake. These effects include the rise of invasive species and the delivery, through stormwater runoff, of pollutants and nutrients that can stimulate algal blooms. Because it’s hard to tease apart the impacts of these various stressors on the lake’s water quality and wildlife, Relyea’s team has done a bevy of experiments in the lab and in large outdoor tanks to isolate and examine the consequences of increasing salt.

  • Freshwater Is Getting Saltier, Threatening People and Wildlife

    December 21, 2018 -

    Salts that de-ice roads, parking lots and sidewalks keep people safe in winter. But new research shows they are contributing to a sharp and widely rising problem across the U.S. At least a third of the rivers and streams in the country have gotten saltier in the past 25 years. And by 2100, more than half of them may contain at least 50 percent more salt than they used to. Increasing salinity will not just affect freshwater plants and animals but human lives as well—notably, by affecting drinking water.

  • Brain Scans Can Detect Who Has Better Skills

    October 3, 2018 -

    To gain new insight into how highly specialized workers learn skills or react to stressful situations, researchers are leveraging advanced scanning technologies to look at what’s happening inside the brain.