The Center for Biotechnology & Interdisciplinary Studies at Rensselaer

The Center for Biotechnology & Interdisciplinary Studies (CBIS) is uniquely focused on fostering collaborative research across disciplines. Researchers from life sciences, physical science, informatics, bioengineering, data modeling, bioimaging, engineering, lighting systems and engineering, and media technologies can come together to work on global challenges.

As the hub of biotechnology-based research at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, the Center is recognized for its basic and applied research, world-class infrastructure and support staff, and growing funding base.

Our research portfolio includes ground-breaking work in biologics, bioimaging, biomanufacturing, biomolecular science and engineering, biophysics and structural biology, microbiomics, neuroscience, stem cell engineering, and genomics.  More about CBIS

Over Ten Years

  • 36 Faculty
  • 200 Ph.D.s Granted
  • 1,000 Undergrads Trained
  • 2,000 Peer-Reviewed Publications
  • 30,000 Citations (ISI)
  • $130MExternal Grant Funding

News & Events

Rensselaer-Developed Algorithm Accurately Predicts COVID-19 Patient Outcomes

With communities across the nation experiencing a wave of COVID-19 infections, clinicians need effective tools that will enable them to aggressively and accurately treat each patient based on their specific disease presentation, health history, and medical risks.

Rensselaer Partners with St. Peter’s Health Partners to Extend Lab Capabilities for COVID-19 Testing

To extend its COVID-19 testing capabilities, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute has partnered with St. Peter’s Health Partners to establish a Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendment (CLIA) overflow lab at Rensselaer under the St. Peter’s license.

To Benefit Paralyzed Veterans, Polymer Coating Aims To Extend Life of Microelectrodes

For individuals with central nervous system paralysis, the effectiveness of neuroprosthetic technology — such as brain-controlled prosthetic limbs or muscle stimulation devices — makes a world of difference. If the process of implanting tiny electrodes in the brain were to be improved, allowing for stronger and longer lasting communication between neurons and external devices, it could significantly enhance quality of life.

New Research Aims To Combat Prion-like Spread of Tau Pathology in Alzheimer’s

Armed with evidence that a specific site on heparan sulfate — known as the 3-O-sulfate group — is critical to the transfer of harmful tau proteins in the brain, a research program funded by the NIH’s National Institute of Aging is scrutinizing the interactions between heparan sulfate and tau, determining how misfolded tau spreads in the brain, and developing strategies to block it.

Our Center

  • 150 PhD Students
  • 50 Postdoctoral Fellows
  • 33 Principal Investigator Laboratories
  • 25 Visiting Research Scientists
  • 218,000 sq ft modern facility
  • 31, 240 sq ft of open research labs
  • 13,009 sq ft of support labs
  • 27,350 sq ft of core facilities
  • 5,830 sq ft conference and seminar space